CfP for Contributions to Panels at the IPRA Conference on ‚Building Sustainable Development‘

What follows, is the text of the Call for Papers:
The Institute for Development and Peace (Institut für Entwicklung und Frieden – INEF, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany, will organize four panels at the 2008 Global Conference of the International Peace Research Organization (IPRA), to be held 15-19 July 2008, in Leuven, Belgium (http://www.ipra2008.org/).

What follows, is the text of the Call for Papers:
The Institute for Development and Peace (Institut für Entwicklung und Frieden – INEF, University of Duisburg-Essen, Germany, will organize four panels at the 2008 Global Conference of the International Peace Research Organization (IPRA), to be held 15-19 July 2008, in Leuven, Belgium (http://www.ipra2008.org/).
Concurrent with the Conference\’s theme ‚Building Sustainable Development: Enacting Peace and Development‘, the panels will focus on issues connecting the fields of peace and development. Four specific themes are presented in more detail below.
Please send an abstract of 200-250 words no later than 15 February 2008 to Tome Sandevski at the eMail: tome.sandevski@inef.uni-due.de. Please indicate for which panel you would like to have your abstract considered and include your institutional affiliation and full contact information (postal and email address, phone, fax) in your submission. We aim to inform you about our decision by 29 February 2008. Academics from developing countries are particularly encouraged to apply.
Thanks to the support of the Federal Ministry for Economic Cooperation and Development, partial or full funding for travel and accomodation expenses can be provided.

Panel 1: The Internal Dynamics of Hybrid Political Orders
In most developing societies, the boundaries between the polity, the economy and societal institutions are blurred. This interpenetration of social spheres leads to the emergence of hybrid political orders which en-compass the formal state apparatus, informal institutions, \’civil society\‘ groups as well as economic actors. These hybrid orders are characterized by a plurality of overlapping rule systems which has a profound ef-fect on politics and policies in these societies. However, at present very little is known about these orders\‘ internal dynamics. This lacuna includes such basic questions as: How do these orders form and how do they evolve? How do hybrid orders relate to external actors as well as broader processes of social change such as globalization, urbanization and modernization? And how do hybrid political orders influence proc-esses of state-building and state failure?
Panel 2: Donors\‘ Responses to Hybrid Political Orders
Hybrid political orders (see panel #1) are not only governed by a particular internal logic, their relationship to development and peace is ambiguous. While such orders can sometimes act as stabilizing institutions, development policy has a hard time coming to grips with these political formations. The questions that this panel will address are mostly empirical in nature: How have donors reacted to hybrid political orders? Have they adapted, broken off contact or are they turning a blind eye to these institutions? The panel particularly welcomes contributions that analyse the micro-level interaction between donor and recipient actors.
Panel 3: The Role of Youth in Development and Peace-Building
The category of youth is closely related to cultural definitions and to processes of social change. In the discussions of international donors and NGOs children and youth have traditionally been perceived as vic-tims (of maldevelopment as well as of violence), while the current debate focuses on youth as a security problem (e.g. youth bulges, former child soldiers). But for most developing societies youth represents an important potential for development. The challenge for national governments as well as international donors is how youth can be integrated into development and peace-building projects in spite of social stratification and limited economic prospects. What role does youth play in different social spheres and what are instru-ments for youth empowerment? Single case studies, comparative research and policy-oriented contributions are equally welcome.
Panel 4: The Role of Regional Organizations in Conflict Resolution
In spite of great hopes being placed in them, regional organizations have yet to fully actualize their potential when it comes to the prevention and resolution of conflicts. Although there has been some recent progress (notably within the African Union), regional organizations have usually found themselves unable to deci-sively impact both inter-state and intra-state conflicts. And despite the widespread introduction of early warning mechanisms, preventive action still eludes regional organizations. The aim of this panel is to criti-cally examine the role of regional organizations in different crises with the intention of addressing the broader question whether these organizations do have the potential to prevent and resolve conflicts, or whether such aspirations will remain a pipe dream.