CfP: Prejudices and Discrimination between Groups – Comparative Perspectives

More and more cross-national comparisons play a crucial role in research on prejudices and discrimination, as additional data sources for such comparisons become available. In Europe the Eurobarometer, the European Social Survey and several bi- or multi-societal comparisons are monitoring prejudices and discrimination. We know less about cross-cultural research in other continents.

More and more cross-national comparisons play a crucial role in research on prejudices and discrimination, as additional data sources for such comparisons become available. In Europe the Eurobarometer, the European Social Survey and several bi- or multi-societal comparisons are monitoring prejudices and discrimination. We know less about cross-cultural research in other continents.
This issue aims to bring together comparative analyzes. It focuses explicitly on cross-cultural comparisons of prejudices, discrimination and other indicators of intergroup differentiation. It features cross-national comparative studies focused on the influence of society-specific and universal conditions that foster conflicts between groups. Relevant topics include not only causes and expressions of intergroup conflicts but also outcomes of such conflicts from a comparative perspective. Research representing a range of approaches is welcomed, including theoretical and empirical studies, studies informed by interdisciplinary perspectives, and studies that implement quantitative or qualitative techniques. Researchers from all countries and continents are encouraged to contribute! The editors encourage especially researchers from Asia, Africa, South America and/or Eastern Europe. The issue will focus on prejudices and discrimination, but other phenomena of intergroup differentiation linked to prejudice and discrimination are relevant as well. The scope can range from small to large scale comparisons between cultures or nations. Additionally, papers on intervention, prevention and policy making across cultures are welcome.
To be considered for inclusion in the issue, please submit a 2-page abstract no later than February 28, 2010.
Final papers (40.000 characters incl. spaces) are expected by July 31, 2010,
Final revisions are expected by September 2010
Editors: Andreas Zick (University of Bielefeld, Germany) & Katharina Schmid (University of Oxford, GB)